Redes sociales y conducta ingestiva | 10 JUN 19

Influencers y marketing de alimentos no saludables

Influencia de las redes sociales en el consumo infantil de alimentos y snacks
Autor/a: Anna E. Coates, M. Phil, Charlotte A. Hardman y colaboradores Pediatrics. 2019;143(4):e20182554
INDICE:  1. Página 1 | 2. Referencias bibliográficas
Referencias bibliográficas

1. Swinburn BA, Sacks G, Hall KD, et al. The global obesity pandemic: shaped by global drivers and local environments. Lancet. 2011;378(9793):804–814

2. Powell LM, Schermbeck RM, Chaloupka FJ. Nutritional content of food and beverage products in television advertisements seen on children’s programming. Child Obes. 2013;9(6): 524–531

3. Whalen R, Harrold J, Child S, Halford J, Boyland E. The health halo trend in UK television food advertising viewed by children: the rise of implicit and explicit health messaging in the promotion of unhealthy foods. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2018;15(3):E560

4. Swinburn B, Sacks G, Ravussin E. Increased food energy supply is more than sufficient to explain the US epidemic of obesity. Am J Clin Nutr. 2009;90(6):1453–1456

5. Vandevijvere S, Chow CC, Hall KD, Umali E, Swinburn BA. Increased food energy supply as a major driver of the obesity epidemic: a global analysis. Bull World Health Organ. 2015;93(7):446–456

6. World Health Organization. Report of the Commission on Ending Childhood Obesity. Available at: https://www.who.int/end-childhood-obesity/publications/echo-report/en/. Accessed June 6, 2017

7. Boyland EJ, Nolan S, Kelly B, et al. Advertising as a cue to consume: a systematic review and meta-analysis of the effects of acute exposure to unhealthy food and nonalcoholic beverage advertising on intake in children and adults. Am J Clin Nutr. 2016;103(2):519–533

 

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